Monthly Archives: August 2004

Addressbook 2 iCal

iCalShifter is a little awesome opensource application allows you to bulk transfer your Birthday information of people in your Address Book and shift it into iCal.

For those who don’t know, iCal uses ics formatting for it’s calendar file format which allows you to easily publish your calendars and syndicate other peoples calendars. I’m still trying to figure out how to combine calendars so that more then one person can use it (group ware style), this requires WebDav which I’ve had zero experience with but looks easy so far.

Here’s the homepage for iCalShifter: http://www.scotlandsoftware.com/products/icalshifter/index.html

Microsoft Longhorn, now in 2006

The longly touted Longhorn OS which will be replacing WinXP has been pushed back (yet again) to 2006 with the server vesion being pushed back till 2007.

Also the highly anticpated new database file sytem (WinFS) won’t be included in Longhorn. It hasn’t been dumped, just not going to be in the next operating system.

Ordinarily this isn’t a problem for Opensource providers like myself (in fact it’s even good news). What is the problem is how Microsoft continually dangles carrots in front of customers faces saying ‘look look we’ve got the best system ever coming out ($thisyear+1)!!’ all the time making customers hestiant to make a decision until they see this new system.

You can read more by visting the best news site in Australia

wp-mail mod update! Now 0.2!

Thanks for all the feedback for my last wp-mail mod. I’ve done a lot of bug fixing in this release, and added a few features. Still working on improving though, so let me know how you guys go with this version!

Here’s the new version: Thanks for all the feedback for my last wp-mail mod. I’ve done a lot
of bug fixing in this release, and added a few features. Still
working on improving though, so let me know how you guys go with this
version!

Here’s the new version:wp-mail-0.2.zip

<rip from README-wp-mail.php>
Wordpress 1.2 – wp-mail hack
Released 2004-08-26 – Version 0.2
By John B. Hewitt – [email protected]
Blog: http://blade.lansmash.com

License
-=-=-=-=-=–
It’s GPL! Credits are in the wp-mail.php code.

Introduction
-=-=-=-=-=-=-
This hack is a ‘drop in’ replacement for the current wp-mail.php. It uses pear as a mime compliant email ‘decoder’. What’s cool is that you can attach images inline in your email messages and they’ll be shown as an image in your wordpress article. It does this by decoding the image attachments and writing them to ‘wp-photos’ directory (not in default wp install).

History
-=-=-=-
* Version 0.2 – 2004-08-26
* – Stopped using pear body decoding in favour of own decoding (may be slower but more modifiable) because of enriched text decoding
* – Added base64_decode checking (may help mobile phone users)
* – Fixed Subject line for non-english users (htmlentities instead of just trim)
* – Fixed error in some pop hanging -> more graceful exit on event on no emails in inbox ($pop3->quit)
* – Added work around for email addresses with exta <> in field (ie: <[email protected]> instead of [email protected]
* – Added some ===basic=== enriched text support
* – Updated readme file for easier install
* – Easy modify of globals (such as photosdir and filesdir)
* – Cleaned up some pear stuff in install
*
* Version 0.1 – 2004-06-20
* First release (was released under version 1.0 initially, oh boy was I silly)

Features
-=-=-=-=-
It has all the abilities of the current wp-mail.php plus:
- Allows image attachments (posts inline! Main reason I built this mod!!)
- Checks if user email address is in the database (otherwise discards message)
- Allows other file attachments (zip’s, exe’s, etc)
- You can post to various categories (ie, 1 = General)
- Fairly good cleaner for removing excessive line breaks

Would love to see it in the wordpress core
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
I’m planning on more updates, but would love to see this update included in future wordpress releases. Would be happy to maintain it to, I’m fairly sure it complies with most of the coding guidelines I’ve read on
the wordpress coding standard.

Install
-=-=-=-=-
To install you grab the zip file.
- – Drop the two files (wp-mail.php & mailmimedecode.php & PEAR.php) into your wordpress 1.2 root directory
- – Create the directories ‘wp-photos’ and ‘wp-filez’ in the wordpress root directory (with writing permissions (probably 0777).

That’s it. You should now be able to post email to wordpress.

Features to come
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Immediate features to come:
- Direct email script that parses email as it comes in (so removes cronjobs)
- GPG/PGP signature verification
- Better enriched text support (only basic stuff at the moment)
- Better security for file attachments (no .php stuff, less l33t hax0rs)
- Look ups for Category posting

Usage
-=-=-=-
You can use the wp-mail hack just like the old wp-mail.

Make sure you change your email client to use HTML encoded messages, that way you’ll get a better looking post that is similar to what you emailed.

When emailing to your blog you can also change the category the post is going to. To do so change the subject line to include [1] at the beginning where one is the number of the category you want to post to.
1 is usually General’s category, so if I want my email to go to the General board I type:
Subject: [1] This is a test

FAQ
-=-
- If you are using Mozilla (thunderbird,etc), use HTML mail! Not HTML/TEXT combined! (One day this script will be able to decode both at the same time, just not today)
- If you are using Outook/Outlook express, use HTML mail!
- If you are using Mac OS X email, you’re sweet
- You can change the default photos and files directories. The variables are on the top of the wp-mail.php code.

Dvorak Keyboards

I’m trying to learn the Dvorak Keyboard layout, you know the keyboard layout that is better in most ways to Qwerty!

dvorakKeymap.gif
My powerbook easily allows to change between Qwerty and Dvoark keyboard layouts which makes it easy to get work done in the meantime. I’ve found a nice website to start learning Dvorak – http://www.gigliwood.com/abcd/abcd.html

I’m up to lesson 8 and are straining to continue. I just want to type really fast! (I’m a 60wpm+ qwerty person at the moment) So it’s difficult, they also recommend that you don’t use Qwerty for a month when you first start out! I can guarantee that ain’t gonna happen, not with me having to jump on other peoples machines and fix this and that. Let alone trying to get any work done whilst learning a new keyboard layout.

Maybe, just maybe with a little bit of luck I’ll get there… here’s hoping!

Soapbox Email: Mozilla/Thunderbird Setup

Soapbox: Mozilla/Thunderbird – IMAP setup for Windows

Mozilla Mail comes with all newer versions of Mozilla. These instructions assume that you are using Mozilla 1.4 (or greater) or Thunderbird 0.7 (or greater) for Windows 98/Me/2000/XP. The configuration might be slightly different for other versions of Mozilla/Thunderbird.

Before this process you need to have a few details with your email system. These are:
- Email Address (such as [email protected])
- Your email address password
- Domain name (name of your company, such as example.com.au)
- Mail server address (such as mail.example.com.au or an IP address 192.168.1.1)

1) When you launch Mozilla Mail/Thunderbird for the first time the Account Wizard may start automatically. In that case, skip to step 2 below. If it does not, you can add a new account via the menu bar Tools->Account Settings and pressing the button ‘Add Account’.

T0.JPG

2) The first screen asks what kind of account you want to set up. The default Email account" is correct, so just click Next.

0.JPG

3) Type in your name as you want it to appear on outgoing email in the Your Name box. Type in you email address in the form "[email protected]" where ‘example.com.au’ is your own domain name. Then click Next.

1.JPG

4) Change the incoming server type to IMAP.
In the Incoming Server box, type your mail server (i.e. mail.example.com.au) and your e-mail address.

T3.JPG

5) Enter your e-mail user name as the User Name. Typically your user name is your first and surname combined.

thunderbird-3.jpg

6) You may be asked to name your account. You can leave the default, which is your email address, or change it. Then click Next.

thunderbird-5.jpg

The final screen summarizes the information that you just entered. Verify that it is correct and then click Finish.

7) The process is almost complete and requires one last setting to allow you to send e-mail outside your office.
Open your e-mail account details via the menu bar Tools->Account Settings. Then highlight the ‘Outgoing Server (SMTP)’ section.

T10.JPG

Tick the box ‘Use name and Password’ and hit Ok. This will authenticate your e-mail server when sending e-mail’s outside the office.

Conclusion: You should now have a configured mail client. You should send a test e-mail to another work mate to test if you are sending email and have them reply back to see if you are receiving e-mail.

Soapbox: Setting up Outlook for e-mail

Soapbox: Setting up Outlook for e-mail

This document explains how to configure Microsoft Outlook to access a Soapbox e-mail server. This assumes that Outlook is installed and has the latest security service packs applied.

Before continuing you need to have a few account details. These are:
- Email Address (such as [email protected])
- Your e-mail address password
- Domain name (name of your company, such as example.com.au)
- Mail server address (such as mail.example.com.au or an IP address 192.168.1.1)

1) Start Microsoft Outlook. From the Tools menu, select Email Accounts.

ol2imap1.gif

2) Click Add a new e-mail account.
Click Next.

O0.JPG

3) Select IMAP the click Next.

O-IMAP.JPG

4) Type in the information Outlook XP asks for. This includes your name, email address, your Unity logon ID and password, and the incoming and outgoing mail servers. It is fairly straight forward if you have the details required. Here is a list to help explain what needs to be filled out.

Incoming mail server (IMAP): Enter your mail server detail such as mail.example.com.au
Outgoing mail (SMTP) server: This should be the same as your incoming server such as mail.example.com.au
User Name: Enter your email username – such as [email protected]
Password: Enter your email password
Remember password: Check this box and you won’t be prompted each time you start Outlook. When you change your password on the system, remember to come back here to change it to match.

OUTLOOK1.JPG

Once filled out, click on the ‘More Settings’ button to continue.

5) You will now have the ‘Internet Email’ dialogue box open. Click on the Outgoing Server tab to continue.
You must check the box with the text "Outgoing mail server: My server requires authentication", otherwise you will not be able to send email when you are not in the office.

O2.JPG

Click OK to complete the configuration.
Click Next, then Finish to complete the Email Accounts dialogue.

Conclusion: You should now have a configured mail client. You should send a test e-mail to another work mate to test if you are sending e-mail and have them reply back to see if you are receiving e-mail.